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One of the most significant activities conducted in space takes place when human beings depart their
spacecraft and travel about and perform work in a spacesuit. Extravehicular activities (EVA) require
some of the most complex technical skills, sophisticated technologies, and human capabilities of all
missions undertaken in space. The first of these EVAs took place on 18 March 1965 during the
Soviet Union’s Voskhod 2 orbital mission when cosmonaut Alexei Leonov first departed the spacecraft in Earth orbit to test the concept. In June of 1965, during the flight of Gemini 4, Edward White
II, performed the first EVA by an American. Since that time hundreds of hours have been amassed by
humans conducting EVAs in both Earth orbit and on the lunar surface. Between that time and April
1997, when Jerry Linenger conducted an EVA with Vladimir Tsibliyev as part of International Space
Station Phase I, 154 EVAs have been undertaken.
These total EVAs have not only accomplished significant work in space, work impossible through
any other means, but also yielded enormous knowledge, skills, and experience among the astronaut
and cosmonaut corps about how to perform meaningful work beyond the confines of Earth’s atmosphere. Walking to Olympus: An EVA Chronology, by David S.F. Portree and Robert C. Treviño, is a
comprehensive chronicle of all of the EVAs conducted since the dawn of the space age. Because
history is so important in helping to chart the direction for the future, this monograph’s publication is
especially significant because the building of the International Space Station near the end of this
century will require many more hours of EVA than has been previously undertaken altogether. One
of our goals for publishing this monograph at this time is to help inform officials and the general
public of what EVAs have been done before, what they accomplished, and what hurdles had to be
surmounted to accomplish them
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David S. F. Portree and Robert C. Treviño
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One of the most significant activities conducted in space takes place when human beings depart their
spacecraft and travel about and perform work in a spacesuit. Extravehicular activities (EVA) require
some of the most complex technical skills, sophisticated technologies, and human capabilities of all
missions undertaken in space. The first of these EVAs took place on 18 March 1965 during the
Soviet Union’s Voskhod 2 orbital mission when cosmonaut Alexei Leonov first departed the spacecraft in Earth orbit to test the concept. In June of 1965, during the flight of Gemini 4, Edward White
II, performed the first EVA by an American. Since that time hundreds of hours have been amassed by
humans conducting EVAs in both Earth orbit and on the lunar surface. Between that time and April
1997, when Jerry Linenger conducted an EVA with Vladimir Tsibliyev as part of International Space
Station Phase I, 154 EVAs have been undertaken.
These total EVAs have not only accomplished significant work in space, work impossible through
any other means, but also yielded enormous knowledge, skills, and experience among the astronaut
and cosmonaut corps about how to perform meaningful work beyond the confines of Earth’s atmosphere. Walking to Olympus: An EVA Chronology, by David S.F. Portree and Robert C. Treviño, is a
comprehensive chronicle of all of the EVAs conducted since the dawn of the space age. Because
history is so important in helping to chart the direction for the future, this monograph’s publication is
especially significant because the building of the International Space Station near the end of this
century will require many more hours of EVA than has been previously undertaken altogether. One
of our goals for publishing this monograph at this time is to help inform officials and the general
public of what EVAs have been done before, what they accomplished, and what hurdles had to be
surmounted to accomplish them
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https://history.nasa.gov/monograph7.pdf
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